By ATMmarketplace.com

LINK, operator of the U.K. cash machine network, has launched its free ATM locator app, which it describes as “the most comprehensive mobile application of its type for finding ATMs in the U.K.”

The app connects to the LINK ATM database and shows the location of all 70,000 LINK ATMs — effectively every cash machine in the U.K., according to a press release.

The new app was developed with the support of Thomas Pocklington Trust, a national sight loss charity that works to increase awareness and understanding of the needs of the visually impaired.

The app will shows its user the nearest ATM is, and has the ability to filter search results — for example, by providing information on distance to an ATM that provides audio assistance; ATMs that dispense 5-pound notes; free-to-use ATMs; and ATMs belonging to specific organizations, e.g., the user’s financial institution.

Additional features include:

  • full access for visually impaired people through voiceover technology, developed with the support of Thomas Pocklington Trust;
  • hints and tips for users on personal safety and protecting their PIN;
  • users can set a number of ATMs — for instance, those near home or work — as favorites; the app will lets them know when they’re in close proximity to a favorite ATM as a reminder to get cash; and
  • users can provide feedback to LINK and its members about machines they use.

“LINK is committed to financial inclusion and the independent LINK Consumer Council has been fully behind this exciting initiative,” LINK CEO John Howells said in the release. “Cash remains an essential part of our lives and is still the most attractive payment option for many of us in lots of situations. The new, free app will make finding an ATM more convenient for everyone and, with its search filters, make it easier for vulnerable consumers to draw out their cash safely … ”

The LINK locator app is available from the Apple app store and Google Play as a free download.

LINK rolls out ATM locator app with features for visually impaired users